It’s Banned Books Week — read something controversial!

BBW_2015_MiniPoster_200x300Y’know, like the “scary” Harry Potter, Blubber, Captain Underpants, Go Ask Alice, A Wrinkle in Time, Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret… All these books got someone’s uptight self in a bunch.  Or lots of bunches.  Because to some, Books Scary.

Why all the YA?  Because this year, Banned Books Week is focusing on Young Adult books.  The ones that can mold you into the person you’ll become.  Many of these helped me become who I am today.  Yeah yeah, for better or worse.  Gotcha.

Be subversive.  Read a few.  Better yet, share them with your favorite young adults.  Or youngish adults.  Or childish adults.  Just read.

And read the full press release after the jump, why don’cha?

BBW_2015_MiniPoster_200x300Banned Books Week celebrates Young Adult books in 2015

New York — Young Adult books will be the focus of Banned Books Week in 2015, the event’s national planning committee announced today. Banned Books Week, the annual celebration of the freedom to read, will run from September 27 through October 3, 2015, and will be observed in libraries, schools, bookstores and other community settings across the nation and the world.

“Young Adult books are challenged more frequently than any other type of book,” said Judith Platt, chair of the Banned Books Week National Committee. “These are the books that speak most immediately to young people, dealing with many of the difficult issues that arise in their own lives, or in the lives of their friends. These are the books that give young readers the ability to safely explore the sometimes scary real world. This Banned Books Week is a call to action, to remind everyone that young people need to be allowed the freedom to read widely, to read books that are relevant for them, and to be able to make their own reading choices.”

In recent years, the majority of the most frequently challenged books in libraries have been Young Adult (YA) titles. Six YA titles were on the list of the Top Ten Most Challenged Books of 2014, according to the American Library Association. Attempted bans on books of all kinds also frequently occur under the guise of protecting younger audiences.

Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read by encouraging read-outs, displays, and community activities that raise awareness of the ongoing threat of censorship. Last year, tens of thousands of people participated in Banned Books Week online.  More than 500 videos were posted in a virtual read-out, and thousands participated in hundreds of events in bookstores, libraries, and schools and universities across the country.

BannedBooksWeek.org is a hub for information about how individuals and institutions can get involved. The website also includes resources and activities provided by event sponsors.

Banned Books Week is sponsored by the American Booksellers Association, American Booksellers for Free Expression, American Library Association, American Society of Journalists and Authors, Association of American Publishers, Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, Freedom to Read Foundation, National Association of College Stores, National Coalition Against Censorship, National Council of Teachers of English, People For the American Way Foundation, PEN American Center, and Project Censored.

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